I study the population and community ecology of plants and insects, particularly
in the context of climate change.

I am especially interested in species interactions, community assembly,
and the ecology of native bees.

Graduate research

For my doctoral work, I am studying the drivers and consequences of bumble bee body size variation, particularly in the context of climate change.

 

Body size is a “master trait,” with profound physiological and ecological consequences. For bumble bees, size variation between and within species and caste correlates to differences in behavior, diet, and foraging. Bumble bee’s size also appears to be connected to their decline – larger bee species are declining faster, and bumble bees appear to be getting smaller.

 

I use a variety of approaches in my research, including field-based observational studies, laboratory experiments, and population modeling.

Previous research